Tag: Steelpan

The view from Paramin of Port of Spain with the lights of Point Lisas visible across the Gulf of Paria. Photo by Chris Anderson

This is Trinidad

An ode to contemporary Trinidad Location, location, location… Trinidad’s uniqueness comes from its hybridity, its history, and its geography. From its very beginnings, as part of the South American mainland, it has been unique. Thousands of species thrive in the lush Northern and Central Ranges, while the south is continually invaded by animals washed down

From left to right: Nigel Williams, Manager, Trinidad All Stars; Martin Cain, Assistant Manager, Deperadoes; Michael Marcano, Manager, Renegades; Len “Boogsie” Sharpe, Leader, Phase 11; and Ainsworth Mohammed, Manager, Exodus at the launch of the International Steelband Foundation at Hyatt Regency Trinidad recently

The ‘big 5’ for Savannah steelband concert on 22 July

Five of the nation’s top steelbands will launch the International Steelband Foundation at the Queen’s Park Savannah, Port of Spain, with an event titled Big 5 – The Pan Concert on 22 July. Massy Trinidad All Stars, Desperadoes, bp Renegades, Republic Bank Exodus, and Phase II Pan Groove in collaboration with HADCO have come together to

Soca legend Super Blue whips the crowd into a frenzy at QRC fete. Photo by Aaron Richards

Trinidad Carnival: the who, what, where, when, why

The Carnival season is like one large buffet. You can sample all of it over multiple courses; just some of it, by confining yourself to a few things which appeal to you; or none at all (which means leaving the restaurant altogether, to keep the analogy going). But the point is, there’s no right way

A blue devil at the Canboulay Riots Re-enactment. Photo by Warren Le Platte

Trinidad Carnival — what you need to know

A large part of Trinidad Carnival is about abandon and confrontation, an anti-authoritarian movement subverting all that inhibits and represses. So what you’ll find is a strange, testy negotiation between organisation and mayhem, rules and anarchy. And that hot and sweaty, drunk and disorderly, loud and wassy space in the middle is bliss for some, purgatory for others! Love it or hate it, it is a uniquely Trinidadian experience you are unlikely to forget. Are you ready?

Enjoying one of the many Carnival fetes in Trinidad. Photo: Aaron Richards

Our time — Trinidad Carnival in the new millennium

This is the mother of all West Indian style carnivals around the world. The intoxicating mix of high-energy music and street performed by masqueraders, some in costumes 50ft tall, make the massive parade an unforgettable experience of a lifetime.

Original hand-crafted jewellery on sale. Courtesy Green Market Santa Cruz

Made in Trinidad: unique gifts, souvenirs & shopping

No, a ceramic coconut made in China is probably not how you want to remember your trip to Trinidad. Fair enough. But there are exceptionally talented local craftsmen in Trinidad working in leather, clay, fabric, copper and other raw materials like seeds, shells and gourds. And you can find just about anything mainstream, from clothes, houseware and aromatherapy candles to fancy local foods, fashion and jewellery

Machel Montano performs at CIC Fete. Photo by Jermaine Cruickshank, courtesy Machel Montano

Endless Wuk — a Trinidad Carnival Guide

A brief history of Carnival The history of Carnival in Trinidad and Tobago can be read as a history of banned things. When the French arrived in the1780s, they brought a tradition of pre-Lenten celebration, most visibly represented by masquerade balls. The island’s economy and society was supported by slave labour, and those slaves were

Machel Montano

Behind Trinidad’s Music

Trinidad’s multicultural heritage gives our music an intriguing eclecticism, and a range of rhythms and styles that’s guaranteed to please

Exodus at Panorama. Photo courtesy TDC

The making of a steelpan

The steel pan (it’s really a bit of a faux pas to call it a steel drum!) is one of Trinidad’s proudest exports. It distinguishes itself by being the only acoustic, non-electric instrument invented in the 20th century, and one incubated in Laventille, Port of Spain, during the Second World War

Masquerader. Photo by Stephen Broadbridge

The Trinidad Carnival season

The ritual of Trinidad Carnival involves more than buying a costume and jumping in the streets for two days. Let us initiate you into the customs of Carnival. It’s a season — a lifestyle!