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Category: Touring — Trinidad

A tufted coquette (Trinidad & Tobago). Photo: Faraaz Abdool

Trinidad: A Land of Biodiversity

Andean origins give the island of just 1,700 square miles awesome biodiversity. With hundreds of bird and butterfly species, countless hiking and biking paths up mountain trails leading to caves and secluded waterfalls with cooling plunge pools, Trinidad is an eco-lover’s paradise. The island offers natural wonders to explore and experience that are unparalleled anywhere else in the Caribbean.

Tufted Coquette Hummingbird. Courtesy Theo Ferguson of Yerette

Exploring Trinidad’s natural history

Mountains covered with tropical rain forest; mangrove swamps and savannahs; rivers, waterfalls and jungle-green seashores — these are just part of Trinidad’s unique Caribbean/South American legacy. We may be separated by just a few miles of sea, but not long ago — a few seconds of geological time — we were part of the mainland. Learn about Trinidad’s natural history, with advice from a local hiker and tour guide about how best to go out and explore

Blue devils in Paramin. Photo by Chris Anderson

Paramin: a forgotten world

A unique rural community nestled far above the city

A scarlet macaw. Photo by Chris Anderson

Trinidad & Tobago — a birder’s paradise

Photographer and naturalist Roger Neckles of Avifauna Tours on Trinidad & Tobago birds and birdwatching

Young scarlet ibis (distinguished by the dark feathers among the red ones) feed on the Caroni Swamp mudflats. Photo by Chris Anderson

Trinidad & Tobago Sightseeing Tours

Discover talks to T&T Sightseeing Tours’ visionary founder Charles Carvalho. They offer easy sightseeing tours, city tours, Tobago day tours, historical tours, golf trips, and nature tours including mild to strenuous hikes, boat tours, diving trips, and turtle-watching and birding, and arrange hotel reservations, car rentals, aircraft charter, conferencing, and cultural itineraries.

Kayaking in Nariva swamp. Photo by Stephen Broadbridge

Stephen Broadbridge on Trinidad’s best eco adventures

Discover T&T talked to Stephen Broadbridge of Caribbean Discovery Tours about his favourite Trinidad eco breaks

A leatherback makes its way to the sea at Grande Riviere. Photo: Stephen Jay Photography

Top 10 things to do & see in Trinidad

Our top 10 picks for what to do and see in Trinidad

The Bamboo Cathedral in Chaguaramas. Photo by Chris Anderson

Chaguaramas & the northwest peninsula | Touring Trinidad

Hiking, watersports, beaches, offshore islands, museums, nightclubs, caves, all in the protected Charguaramas national park. Plus: Fort George and Diego Martin highlights

An aerial view of Port of Spain, Trinidad. Photo by Stephen Broadbridge

Touring Trinidad: Port of Spain

Port of Spain is a booming, buzzing metropolis, expanding within its boundaries with new business developments stimulated by inward investment. The capital of Trinidad and Tobago, it sprawls from the Gulf of Paria back into the foothills of the rugged Northern Range. When it became the capital in 1757, it was a muddy little seaport. Now, it is one of the busiest commercial centres in the Caribbean, and a hotbed of entrepreneurial and artistic activity as well.

View from the Trinidad Hilton

The Queen’s Park Savannah | Touring Trinidad

A mile or so north of Woodford Square, between the downtown area and the hills of the Northern Range, the Queen’s Park Savannah is the city’s largest green space, enjoyed by everyone from joggers and cricketers and Easter kite-flyers to vendors of oysters, corn and coconuts.

Young scarlet ibis (distinguished by the dark feathers among the red ones) feed on the Caroni Swamp mudflats. Photo by Chris Anderson

Central & the west coast | Touring Trinidad

Exploring “central”: Caroni Bird Sanctuary—Chaguanas—La Vega Estate—Ajoupa Pottery—Pointe-à-Pierre Wild Fowl Trust—San Fernando —Princes Town—Navet Dam; Carapichaima—Waterloo—Point Lisas The landscape of central Trinidad is marked by rivers, rolling plains, swamps and cane fields. Cocoa, sugar cane and rice plantations were once the main economic earners of the area. Vegetable and rice farmers still use the central