Tag: Bird-watching

The Nariva river meets the Atlantic Ocean near Manzanilla. Photo by Jason Audain

Courtenay Rooks on Trinidad’s eco adventures | Q&A

Discover T&T talked to Courtenay Rooks — a tour operator, naturalist, and conservationist with decades of experience — about what makes Trinidad such a compelling destination for eco lovers and those looking for unique, immersive vacations

A Black-throated mango hummingbird at the Adventure Eco Villas in Tobago. Photo by Rapso Imaging

Tobago sightseeing — and boons for birders!

Our favourite sightseeing spots, day trips, and birdwatching sites for 2018!

Blue and yellow macaws were successfully re-introduced to Trinidad in the early 2000s after being extirpated by habitat loss and the pet trade. Photo by Chris Anderson

Bird-watching in Trinidad

The island is blessed with nearly 500 recorded species — among the top 10 countries in the world for number of species per square mile. Peak birding season is November–May, but there’s lots to see year-round. Ornithologists flock here because of the diversity and accessibility to the birds. You can stay on the road and easily record 60 species on a single outing. Here’s where you’ll want to head for the best bird-watching

Pigeon Point. Photo courtesy TDC

What to see & do in Tobago

Sightseeing, day trips, and eco escapes by land and by sea

Caroni Swamp. Photo by Chris Anderson
Leatherback Turtle returning to sea. Courtesy The Division of Tourism and Transportation

Our top 5 Tobago eco experiences

Our favourite Tobago eco escapes & adventures, by land & by sea: turtle-watching, bird-watching, horse-riding, watersports, ang glorious diving!

Argyle Waterfall. Courtesy The Division of Tourism and Transportation

Eight things to see & experience in Tobago

Here are eight of our favourite Tobago experiences The Northside: a ride on the wild side The road less travelled along the Caribbean coast is a wonderland of serenity, stunning natural beauty, and old-time living. From the moment you turn on to the Northside Road, you feel the difference. The world is suddenly greener. Quieter.

Caroni Bird Sanctuary. Photograph by Robert Ramkissoon

A Trinidad eco & adventure guide: bird-watching, hiking & more

Trinidad is known to wildlife experts and enthusiasts for the sheer mind-boggling number of animal species and habitats crowded together on one small island just 50 miles long by 37 miles wide. Having once been part of South America, Trinidad has evolved both continental and island life forms: 108 native mammals (57 of which are bats), 460 birds, 55 reptiles, 25 amphibians, and 620 butterflies, as well as over 2,500 species of flowering plants (700 of which are orchids), 370 species of tree and 300 types of ferns. Nowhere else in the West Indies can match this level of diversity – and few areas of comparable size anywhere in the tropical Americas

Tufted Coquette Hummingbird. Courtesy Theo Ferguson of Yerette

Exploring Trinidad’s natural history

Mountains covered with tropical rain forest; mangrove swamps and savannahs; rivers, waterfalls and jungle-green seashores — these are just part of Trinidad’s unique Caribbean/South American legacy. We may be separated by just a few miles of sea, but not long ago — a few seconds of geological time — we were part of the mainland. Learn about Trinidad’s natural history, with advice from a local hiker and tour guide about how best to go out and explore

A scarlet macaw. Photo by Chris Anderson

Trinidad & Tobago — a birder’s paradise

Photographer and naturalist Roger Neckles of Avifauna Tours on Trinidad & Tobago birds and birdwatching

Glass-bottom boats anchor at the Nylon Pool in Tobago

Tobago eco adventures by land & by sea

One of the world’s top eco destinations, Tobago entices with rainforests, mangroves, wetlands, coral reefs, nesting islands and much more!