Category: Trinidad

Vaughnette Bigford wows the crowd at North Coast Jazz (Blanchisseuse) last May. Her album, Born to Shine is available at vaughnettebigford.com. Photo by Camille Lowhar

Trinidad arts & entertainment 2018

If it’s one thing Trinis take seriously, it’s partying. But, we’re also ride or die with our music, dance, theatre, film, fashion and design, literature, and festivals. Want to know more? Read on!

Photo: Tadeu Brunelli, courtesy the Hyatt Regency Trinidad

Trinidad accommodation guide 2018

International hotel chains, local gems, B&Bs, eco escapes and more — our picks for where to stay in Trinidad for 2018, no matter what your needs or budget!

A Winston Nanan Caroni Swamp boat tour in central Trinidad. Photo by Stephen Broadbridge

Easy Trinidad day trips

In addition to the great eco escapes, adventures, and heritage explorations, there are lots more easy day trips and family-friendly activities you can enjoy on the island

The Gasparee Caves, Trinidad. Photo: Stephen Broadbridge

Family-friendly fun in Trinidad

Chaguaramas The Chaguaramas National Heritage Park in Trinidad’s northwestern peninsula is just 20 minutes from Port of Spain (with no traffic, of which there is a lot on weekends and public holidays). Home to the wondrous Tucker Valley, families share space with hikers, bikers, explorers, bird watchers, hashers, archers, and golfers all have their place

Sunrise at the ever-popular Maracas beach. Photo by Chris Anderson

Beach and river days in Trinidad

For those who love the water, discover some of Trinidad’s most cherished spots to spend days at the beach, or by the river

Waterfall. Photograph by Ariann Thompson

Trinidad hiking and outdoor adventures

Some of Trinidad’s most popular hikes — from easy waterfall hikes, to caves with over a million bats, and the country’s most grueling climb

A giant leatherback turtle heaves her bulk out of the water to nest. Photo courtesy the TDC

Turtle-watching in Trinidad

During peak turtle nesting season (1 March—31 August), five of the seven sea turtle species found globally return to Trinidad’s beaches to lay their eggs. Trinidad is the second largest leatherback nesting site in the world. Two months later, turtle hatchlings emerge (especially from June to August). Witnessing the nesting ritual, and clutches emerging from the sand, is an unforgettable experience

Blue and yellow macaws were successfully re-introduced to Trinidad in the early 2000s after being extirpated by habitat loss and the pet trade. Photo by Chris Anderson

Bird-watching in Trinidad

The island is blessed with nearly 500 recorded species — among the top 10 countries in the world for number of species per square mile. Peak birding season is November–May, but there’s lots to see year-round. Ornithologists flock here because of the diversity and accessibility to the birds. You can stay on the road and easily record 60 species on a single outing. Here’s where you’ll want to head for the best bird-watching

Courtesy Zanzibar

Trini food: the taming of the stew

Foodies may well be stumped for choice here. With African, Indian, French, Spanish, Chinese, Syrian-Lebanese, and other influences, the island’s culinary scene is distinct, dynamic — and delicious! This is just a beginner’s guide — for much more, dive in to the range of coverage, including recipes and local food features, in our Food & Entertainment section.

The view from Paramin of Port of Spain with the lights of Point Lisas visible across the Gulf of Paria. Photo by Chris Anderson

This is Trinidad

An ode to contemporary Trinidad Location, location, location… Trinidad’s uniqueness comes from its hybridity, its history, and its geography. From its very beginnings, as part of the South American mainland, it has been unique. Thousands of species thrive in the lush Northern and Central Ranges, while the south is continually invaded by animals washed down