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Category: Touring — Trinidad

Blue and yellow macaws were successfully re-introduced to Trinidad in the early 2000s after being extirpated by habitat loss and the pet trade. Photo by Chris Anderson

Bird-watching in Trinidad

The island is blessed with nearly 500 recorded species — among the top 10 countries in the world for number of species per square mile. Peak birding season is November–May, but there’s lots to see year-round. Ornithologists flock here because of the diversity and accessibility to the birds. You can stay on the road and easily record 60 species on a single outing. Here’s where you’ll want to head for the best bird-watching

The Port of Spain waterfront. Photo by Chris Anderson

Welcome to Port of Spain

A look at Trinidad’s capital city So much history in such a small place. Beneath its ever-increasing skyscrapers – well, they are, in this part of the world – the story of Port of Spain is still writ large in its contrasting wealth and seediness, the throbbing pulse of downtown Charlotte and Nelson Streets quietening

The long crescent bay at Las Cuevas, Trinidad's Blue Flag Beach, and our favourite for 2017. Courtesy the Tourism Development Company

Our favourite Trinidad beaches

You may not come to Trinidad for the beaches… You’d probably go to Tobago for a beach break! But you still have several fantastic options in Trinidad, especially if you also enjoy things like turtle-watching or hiking or kayaking… Read on for more! And for even more on Trinidad’s beaches, click here, and here! Our

The north coast of Tobago. Photo by Stephen Broadbridge

Trinidad & Tobago: the lay of both lands

The human & physical geography of Trinidad & Tobago in a nutshell

The Gulf of Paria at night

Hometown Trinidad

A look at the homes & sanctuaries of Keshorn Walcott, Nicki Minaj, Anya Ayoung-Chee, and Machel Montano

Green turtles can often be seen on sea grass beds where they feed. Photo by Rapso Imaging

Watching out for Trinidad & Tobago’s turtles

Your guide to turtle-watching and turtle conservation in both Trinidad and Tobago

Caroni Swamp. Photo by Chris Anderson

Trinidad sightseeing day trips

This guide makes no claim to offer a comprehensive listing of things to do in Trinidad. Instead, here is a brief suggestion of some things to do, in each quadrant of the country. Each section is a selection of sights (and sites) that can be visited in a day

The Rio Seco waterfall. Photograph by Anu Lakhan

Keeshan Ramkissoon talks hiking in Trinidad

Keeshan Ramkissoon was awarded the President’s Medal in 2012, in recognition of his contribution to scouting, and studied civil engineering at the University of the West Indies. He is an avid hiker with the instincts of a natural outdoorsman. When you say someone “cuts a new path” it’s usually a cliché but in Keeshan’s case, he actually wants to do the finding, clearing and cutting new trails

Caroni Bird Sanctuary. Photograph by Robert Ramkissoon

A Trinidad eco & adventure guide: bird-watching, hiking & more

Trinidad is known to wildlife experts and enthusiasts for the sheer mind-boggling number of animal species and habitats crowded together on one small island just 50 miles long by 37 miles wide. Having once been part of South America, Trinidad has evolved both continental and island life forms: 108 native mammals (57 of which are bats), 460 birds, 55 reptiles, 25 amphibians, and 620 butterflies, as well as over 2,500 species of flowering plants (700 of which are orchids), 370 species of tree and 300 types of ferns. Nowhere else in the West Indies can match this level of diversity – and few areas of comparable size anywhere in the tropical Americas

The Turure water steps (Cumaca Falls) near Valencia. Photo by Chris Anderson

Go hiking: popular Trinidad hikes for your bucket list

Of all the out-doorsy things you can do in Trinidad & Tobago, hiking is one of the best. Much like the country, hikes can accommodate almost everyone, from the gentle soul who’s looking for equally gentle terrain to the most intrepid, bring-it-on types. Here are some of Trinidad’s most popular hikes — from easy waterfall hikes, to caves with over a million bats, and the country’s most grueling climb

Fort George, Trinidad. Photo: William Barrow

Trinidad sightseeing: our top 24

For a single island, Trinidad is incredibly diverse, her human and physical landscapes varying vastly from coast to coast. Starting early and limiting your stops, you could see the entire island in a day if you really wanted to, either on your own, or with guides. Here are our 24 favourite sights.